Web-Sourcing

Web-Sourcing: Find candidates for free using Google & Bing

Exelare users can now use the power of  Google to find candidates. Google search offers searching with several parameters like zip code, telephone area codes etc.  Our team have made searching inside Google and adding to  Exelare lot more easier.

In Exelare, under "Candidates" click on "Source Candidates"--> Click the option "Web Sourcing".

Users have 2 options in Web-Sourcing:

1)  General Search: Integrated built-in Boolean search
2)  Literal Search: With verbatim, Google will return 'literal' search results to the exact queries entered by the user

General Search:



Literal Search:

Boolean search on Google is one of the best option for recruiters. Boolean search allows users to combine keywords with operators such as AND, NOT and OR to produce more relevant results. Please review the below operators list and maximize your results.






Boolean search operators list

Boolean operator

Use

Example

AND

Results include all keywords linked with AND

developer AND android

OR

Results include either keyword or all of them

android OR mobile

NOT / minus symbol(-)

Excludes a keyword from your search (When using the minus symbol don’t leave a space before the unwanted term)

*Google doesn’t recognize the operator NOT, so use the minus symbol, instead.

-sample

Brackets ()

Group multiple search strings and set priorities

Project (manager OR coordinator)

Quotation marks ” “

Search for an exact phrase (Consider keywords in quotation marks as a whole word)

 “customer service”

intitle: or inurl:

Most people name their resume files using the word ‘resume.’ So, if you want to search Google for candidates’ resumes, it’s best to look for pages that include this word in their title or URL.

(intitle:resume or CV or vitae)

Site:

Searches for candidates in specific website

Site:linkedin.com

Wild Card (*)

You could use an asterisk (*) to get more results for the term you’re looking for.

account* will provide you with results both for accounting and accountant.

filetype:

Google offers you the chance to search the web for files, which is useful if you want to get access to online resumes or portfolios.

Filetype:pdf or filetype:doc or filetype:docx

How recruiters can use Boolean commands

Using Google Boolean search strings for recruiters will improve your search results and eventually get you closer to your potential candidates. Crafting effective commands can be a little tricky, at first, if you’re not familiar with Boolean logic. Here’s a short guide to help you with common searches.

AND, OR
When searching, you need to think from your ideal candidate’s point of view. Let’s say you want to hire a Software developer. If you only look for ‘Web developer’ you’ll probably miss a lot of good profiles that use a different title, like ‘Software developer’ or ‘Web programmer.’ You could combine AND and OR commands to search multiple terms.

Ex:
(web or software) and (developer or programmer) -job -jobs

The minus sign (-)
If you’re wondering why we used the minus sign (-) in the previous example, the answer is simple: to narrow down our results. Once you play around with Boolean search, you’ll realize that you need to exclude some results to get what you’re looking for. It’s usually helpful to get rid of ‘jobs’, ‘templates’ and ‘examples’ when you’re looking for candidate’s resumes.

Quotation marks " "
If you want Google to consider the phrase you’re searching for as a complete phrase, you should put it in quotation marks. For example, leaving a blank space between ‘customer’ and ‘service’ will provide pages that contain both of the words ‘customer’ and ‘service,’ but not necessarily together. You should type “customer service” to get more relevant results when sourcing passive candidates.

site:
A site: search is also known as an x-ray search. You can search through a specific site for candidates with your desired skill set or any additional details that are a top priority for you. The key here is to look in the right place. LinkedIn is useful to search for all kinds of professionals, but for more targeted searches you should crawl niche websites instead.

Ex:
site:linkedin.com (ruby or developer) -jobs
site:github.com (London and ruby and developer) -sample -job -jobs



The wild card (*)
You could use an asterisk (*) to get more results for the term you’re looking for. For example, account* will provide you with results both for accounting and accountant.

Ex:
site:linkedin.com (administer* or recruit* or program*)

If you’re searching specific job titles on LinkedIn, the asterisk could help you create a shorter string. For example, you could type ‘administr*’ instead of ‘administrative OR administrator OR administration’ and get the same results. Likewise, ‘recruit*’ is a simpler alternative of ‘recruiter OR recruiting OR recruitment.


‘intitle:’ or ‘inurl:’
Most people name their resume files using the word ‘resume.’ So, if you want to search Google for candidates’ resumes, it’s best to look for pages that include this word in their title or URL.

Ex:
(intitle:resume or cv or vitae) PHP boston -job -jobs


‘filetype:’
Google offers you the chance to search the web for files, which is useful if you want to get access to online resumes or portfolios.

Ex:
(intitle:resume or cv) and (filetype:pdf or filetype:doc or filetype:docx) “IT Manager”


Zip codes
It’s best to localize your search, if you’re only looking for candidates from a specific area. For example, if your target zip code is ‘02210’ in Boston MA, with the use of an application you can track all zip codes in a 20-mile radius. Then, add the zip code range (from low to high) to your Boolean search to narrow down your results. It’s important to include the area as well, so that Google understands your numbers are zip codes.

Ex:
(intitle:resume or cv) "web designer" 01703..02495 (MA or Massachusetts)





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